If you’re into this sport, you definitely need the cooperation of the wind, or you won’t get going at all.

Windsurfing is a surface water sport that combines elements of surfing and sailing. It consists of a board usually 2 to 2.5 meters (6 ft 7 in to 8 ft 2 in) long, with displacements typically between 45 and 150 liters (9.9 and 33.0 imp gal; 12 and 40 US gal), powered by wind on a sail.

The rig is connected to the board by a free-rotating universal joint and consists of mast, boom, and sail. On “short” boards the sail area generally ranges from 1.5 to 12 square metres (16 to 129 sq ft) depending on the conditions, the skill of the sailor, the type of windsurfing being undertaken and the weight of the person windsurfing.

On long boards, upon which the sport was first popularized-sail areas and board lengths are typically larger and the athleticism required is much less.

Many credit S. Newman Darby with the origination of windsurfing by 1964 on the Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania, USA when he invented the "Darby sailboard", which he did not patent due to limited financial resources and inadequate legal advice.

Windsurfing straddles both the laid-back culture of surf sports and the more rules-based environment of sailing.

Windsurfing offers experiences that are outside the scope of other sailing craft designs. Windsurfers can perform jumps, inverted loops, spinning maneuvers, and other "freestyle" moves that cannot be matched by any sailboat.

Category 1
Compulsory Sports
    Aquatics
  • Diving
  • Open Water Swimming
  • Swimming
  • Water Polo